THE ROSE THEATRE TRUST

The Rose Theatre Trust (the “Trust”) was formed during the archaeological excavation in 1989 to address fears that the new building proposed for the site would bring about the destruction of The Rose Playhouse’s remains.

A campaign to ‘Save the Rose’ was launched with enthusiastic support from the public, scholars and actors, including the dying Lord Olivier who gave his last public speech in May 1989 on behalf of The Rose. The Trust managed to secure government funds to delay construction and to bring about a re-design of the proposed new building so that only a small amount of the fabric of The Rose was lost, and a permanent enclosure of this fragile site was created.

In the years that followed the Trust has largely devoted itself to preparing to excavate the complete site and ensure the remains are put on display as a permanent resource for the public. Most recently, in collaboration with English Heritage and the Local Authority’s Archaeology Office, agreement has been reached regarding the best strategy for displaying these friable remains. The Trust is now keen to meet its prime objectives to realise The Rose’s potential for interpretation and display to the public.

 

The Rose Playhouse Trustees

Prof Kathy Dacre (Chair)

Peter Jolly (Joint Deputy Chair)

Prof Christopher Smith (Joint Deputy Chair)

Mike Brierley

Dr Chris Constable 

Ed Cottrell

Louise Doughty

Paul Edmondson

Rt Hon Sir Simon Hughes

Jezreel James

Jonathan Livingstone

Dani Salvadori

Harvey Sheldon

Patrick Spottiswoode

Roy Stephenson, MCIfA FSA

 

Other Officers

Robin Roads – Honorary Treasurer

Dr Johanna Schmitz – Honorary Archivist

 

 

ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES FOR TRUSTEES AND COUNCIL MEMBERS

The Rose Theatre Trust  was formed during the archaeological excavation in 1989 to address fears that the new building proposed for the site would bring about the destruction of The Rose Playhouse’s remains.

A campaign to ‘Save the Rose’ was launched with enthusiastic support from the public, scholars and actors, including the dying Lord Olivier who gave his last public speech in May 1989 on behalf of The Rose. The Trust managed to secure government funds to delay construction and to bring about a redesign of the proposed new building so that only a small amount of the fabric of The Rose was lost, and a permanent enclosure of this fragile site was created.

In the years that followed the Trust has largely devoted itself to preparing to excavate the complete site and ensure the remains are put on display as a permanent resource for the public. Most recently, in collaboration with Historic England and Southwark’s Archaeology Office, agreement has been reached regarding the best strategy for displaying these delicate remains. The Trust is now keen to meet its prime objectives and realise The Rose’s potential for interpretation and display to the public, as in the Rose Revealed Project.

 

The Rose Theatre Trust is an Equal Opportunities Employer.